Meat the future
21 & 23 October

Scientists see cultured meat as a sustainable and animal-friendly alternative for meat. However, before we can make the decision whether or not we want to eat cultured meat, we will have to explore the gastronomic culture that comes with it.

Meat The Future presents cultured meat dishes that we could find on our plates in the future. These dishes were created by a team of chefs, designers, engineers and artists. As cultured meat is still in its infancy, you cannot (yet) try the dishes. Though they may serve as food for thought and discussion!  Meat the future is an exhibition concept of Next Nature Network and Cube Design Museum.

Lab Pearls
Ancient legend has it that Cleopatra slipped a pearl into her drink when she betted Mark Anthony who was able to spend the most money on a meal. Unfortunately for Cleopatra the world did not know yet about Lab Pearls. Lab Pearls are filled with cultured animal fat and have a delicate structure not unlike caviar or tapioca balls. The ripened mix of Lab Pearls has the nutty taste of a good Italian lardo.

Meat Flower in Brothmeat-flowers
These meat flowers are based on the Chinese art of ‘flowering tea’. The small, tightly wrapped bundle of cultured meat unfolds in warm water to reveal a magical flower, complete with elegant leaves and petals. So their intricate artistry can be admired from all sides, the blooms are served in a clear broth of Chinese tea in a clear bowl, garnished with a garden of Asian herbs.

 

Meat Fruit
Be prepared to partake of a completely new culinary experience: meat fruit, a blend of vegetarian and meaty ingredients. The womanly suppleness of sweet fruits and the manly attraction of red meat are joined together in a meaty fruit hybrid to celebrate a surprising combination of flavours.

 

Knitted Steak
The length of muscle fibres used to be determined by the size of the animal in which they grew. Cultured meat does away with these limitations as it has become possible to grow “meat strands” from long strands of muscle tissue. A special knitting machine is used to turn the deeply red meat strands into a steak of a delightful pattern.

Dodo nuggets
The dodo has returned to our table. Thanks to a dried sample of a dodo in the Museum of Natural History of Oxford University it is now possible to taste what sailors ate when they first stepped ashore in Mauritius in 1598. Advanced tissue and genetic research helped food scientists to resurrect this extinct species. Children are expected to love the taste of the dish provided by advanced science. Even more so when it is served with a sweet honey-mustard sauce.

Bone Pickers
Some people enjoy nothing better than gnawing at bones and tearing off the last bits of meat. Gnawing bones are added to the menu so that this culinary habit will not be lost. What is placed on your plate is a surrogate bone structure to which cultured meat has been added. Now you can gnaw and tear to your heart’s content once more.

Meat the future

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